-1
$\begingroup$

If we know the molar mass of a certain element and Avogadro's constant, how can we calculate the mass of a single atom? Do we need to multiply the molar mass with Avogadro's constant?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

For most atoms it's around Ryan's answer.

E.g. Carbon-12:

$$\frac{\ce{12 g}~\ce{C}}{\pu{1 mol}~\ce{C}} \times \frac{\pu{1 mol}~\ce{C}}{\pu{6.022E23 atoms}} = \pu{1.993E-23 g//atom} = \pu{1.993E-27 kg//atom}.$$

That was the molar mass $M$ multiplied by $1/N_\mathrm{A}$, where $N_\mathrm{A}$ is Avagadro's constant.

Thus $M/N_\mathrm{A}$ gives you a calculation for mass of an atom for the specific element.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The average mass of a single element is its atomic mass on the periodic table (measured in $\pu{u}$, the unified atomic mass unit). One $\pu{u}$ equals about $\pu{1.661E-27 kg}$.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.