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Now we know that $\ce{O2}$ is paramagnetic. I was just curious to know if we can find $\ce{O2}$ in gaseous state near magnets (of sufficiently strong intensity)? Or is it just that $\ce{O2}$ displays paramagnetism in liquid state only?

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marked as duplicate by M.A.R., Nicolau Saker Neto, bon, Todd Minehardt, Loong Jan 15 '16 at 14:13

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  • $\begingroup$ Indeed, gaseous $\ce{O2}$ is paramagnetic as well. As to your first question, we live on a planet with oxygen-rich atmosphere, so $\ce{O2}$ can be found pretty much everywhere even without magnets. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jan 15 '16 at 5:30
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    $\begingroup$ Yes - if you put a magnet in a room, theoretically, there would be more O2 near the magnet than further away from it. However, you need a pretty darn strong magnet to make the effect even barely noticeable, which is why we don't die when there's a magnet on the other side of the room from us. $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Jan 15 '16 at 8:20

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