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When you make a wine the more you age it the better the taste. But is there such a thing as too much fermentation where it makes the wine taste worse? If not is there a time where fermentation doesn't really affect the taste anymore?

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  • $\begingroup$ Ageing is usually done after fermentation has finished, though this doesn't mean the question of whether you can ferment too much is invalid. $\endgroup$ – matt_black Dec 23 '15 at 20:12
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    $\begingroup$ Not every wine gets better with age. Even those that do would eventually start getting worse. And of course there is such thing as too much fermentation, for a variety of reasons. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Dec 23 '15 at 21:13
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    $\begingroup$ Aging wine is a science. You Can' just leave a bottle in your cellar to be opened on the 18nth birthday of your firstborn. The cork will dry, opening its pores for air and the wine will oxidize. The popular method to avoid this is to turn the bottles at least once a year (or more frequently, I won't pretend to be an expert), to moisture the cork to prevent oxygen influx. $\endgroup$ – Gyro Gearloose Feb 19 '16 at 21:57
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Continued fermentation of wine produces vinegar, which is not necessarily a bad thing. However, further fermentation may encourage growth of "vinegar eels" (harmless worms, actually, but not very appetizing).

Vinegar itself can be metabolized by microorganisms. According to the Compendium of the Microbiological Spoilage of Foods and Beverages, "several molds, yeast and bacteria are capable of spoiling vinegar... [such as the appropriately named] Lactobacillus acetotolerans."

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