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I had doubt whether carbon monoxide explodes or not. I checked out this resource and found out that carbon monoxide explodes when heated. But they didn't mention the temperature at which it explodes. So my question is that at which temperature does carbon monoxide explode and also at which pressure?

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    $\begingroup$ The key explosive risk is from flammability with oxygen in air, described in your linked table as "explosive limits, vol% in air: 12.5%-74.2%". More chemistry than physics. $\endgroup$ – Henry Dec 15 '15 at 8:20
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At which temperature does carbon monoxide explode?

At a wide range of temperatures.

If mixed with air in a proportion between 12 and 75% it is explosive (assuming a there is an ignition source) - I think this is at standard temperature and pressure - 273K, 0.1 MPa.

Note that 1% of CO in air will cause death within 3 minutes due to its toxic effects.

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  • $\begingroup$ Does that mean that if there is no ignition source and we supply lots of heat it will not explode? $\endgroup$ – AAD INO Dec 16 '15 at 4:23
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I'm assuming you mean autoignition. Carbon monoxide autoignites at $609~\mathrm{^\circ C}$, as stated in this website.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, this is a perfectly fine answer. The question is only asking for the number and you provided it, so don't feel bad about posting it as an answer. $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Dec 15 '15 at 10:05
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On it's own Carbon Monoxide will not explode no matter how much you heat it, unless it is mixed with an Oxidizer. Which is more than can be said for a lot of other gases such as Acetylene.

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