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When silver chloride is exposed to light it can dissociate to silver metal and atomic chlorine. It might be a silly question, but could the chlorine go back into the solution as chloride ions ? if so is this likely to occur? does the outcome change if the solution is being boiled? Thanks!

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The answer is yes and no. Silver chloride doesn't "dissociate", it decomposes into silver metal and dissolved chlorine. The chloride reacts with the water to form hydrochloric acid and hypochlorous acid as shown below: $$\ce{2AgCl_{(s)} +H_2O_{(l)} ->[h\nu] 2Ag_{(s)} + Cl_2_{(aq)} +H_2O_{(l)}->2Ag_{(s)} + HCl_{(aq)} + HClO_{(aq)}}$$

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  • $\begingroup$ Temperature makes a big difference in solubility of AgCl: it increases by over an order of magnitude from room temperature to boiling. See saltlakemetals.com/Solubility_Of_Silver_Chloride.htm $\endgroup$ – DrMoishe Pippik Dec 10 '15 at 3:38
  • $\begingroup$ States of aggregation should not be subscripted, it is not wrong, but the recommendations (Sec. 2.1.) are different. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Dec 10 '15 at 7:45
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    $\begingroup$ It really seems to me that for clarity there should be two separate reaction schemes. Making the whole thing one long line is just confusing. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Jan 2 '16 at 5:04

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