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As the title suggests, i have a question regarding Boyle's law.

As Boyle's law states that "The volume $V$ of a given mass of a gas, is inversely proportional to the pressure $p$ applied to it when the temperature $T$ is constant."

So if we had a gas at say a pressure $p_1$, and a volume $V_1$, corresponding to this pressure at a constant temperature $T_1$.

Now if i were to increase the the temperature of this gas to a new temperature $T_2$ and make it constant. And then apply the same pressure $p_1$ on the gas would the volume still be $V_1$?

Considering the fact that volume and pressure are inversely proportional for a constant temperature, and hence they dont depend on the temperature?? Am i right?

Thanks

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No,the volume would change this time as by Gay Lussac law pressure is directly proportional to temperature which has increased this time and can overcome the pressure you had applied earlier thus increasing the volume.
Also I think you have a misconception regarding the term constant temperature.It means that in Boyle s law pressure is inversely proportional to volume at a given temperature say 200K .But for different temperature the law will follow but with different values.For eg. at a particular temperature 200k it can be:- 200litres and 50 pascal or 100 litres and 100 pascal.For higher temperature it would be:- 200 litres and 100 pascal or 100 litres and 200 pascal.

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You are wrong.As you can see in the image enter image description here for a perticular pressure volume will be greater when teperature will be higher.

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