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enter image description here

I am aware of the (pictured) structure of $\ce{[Co(en)3]^3+}$, but what are the physical properties of this ion? Namely, what is its colour?

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    $\begingroup$ @我叫叶莎 You can safely assume that the additional counter-ions have no effect on the solution’s overall colour. In general, for all transition metal complexes, it is always the central metal that determines the colour. $\ce{[Co(en3)]Cl3}$ is a salt formed of a complex cation with ‘standard’ counter-ions, hence why they are outside of the square brackets. $\endgroup$
    – Jan
    Commented Nov 30, 2015 at 12:54
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    $\begingroup$ The Wikipedia page actually lists a few sources, one of which is the Acta Cryst. B paper by Witiak, Clardy and Martin Jr who solved the structure of the nitrate. Who would have guessed that they obtained yellow-ish crystals? (CC @Joel) $\endgroup$
    – Jan
    Commented Nov 30, 2015 at 13:05

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[Co(en)3]Cl3 was important in coordination chemistry for its stability and stereochemistry and has been isolated as yellow, golden, needle like crystals. It is also described as a yellow, orange solid, soluble in water. The racemic complex is commonly obtained as the di or tri-hydrate although other hydrated forms are known.(Ref:Wikipedia)

The computed physical properties and other chemical data are well documented on @pubchem.

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  • $\begingroup$ I am well aware. But I wanted to know more about the cation [Co(en)3]3+ (tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III)), not the compound [Co(en)3]Cl3 (tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) chloride). $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ Oh OK, then why even mention the chloride anions in the structure? $\endgroup$
    – Technetium
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ I couldn't find any picture of the structure of Co[en]3 without the chloride anions mentioned. There is actually very little easily accessible information about Co[en]3 alone as a cation and not as a component of a compound. Thus, I asked this question. $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 16:16
  • $\begingroup$ Have you tried looking at the site I mentioned @pubchem? Or @chemspider. $\endgroup$
    – Technetium
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 23:01

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