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This question came to me while I was trying to model the list of elements (Mendeleïev), especially their masses and number of electrons. It came to my mind that it might be easier to model each element as Moebius Strip with $n$ twists.

If this is possible, is there any literature about this subject? A methodology to do this?

----EDIT----

Ok, it took me a while to go deep into the subject in order to present "concrete thoughts" but I finally could summarize them into the following spreadsheet:

https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=b20ec7aa903ebb07!701&authkey=!AE5lfNOaYgtJWNg&ithint=file%2cxlsx

The model has a R² = 0.9976 (what I think is pretty good as a first try)

Please check the spreadsheet in the following order:

A) Observation VS calculation

B) Racionale ( that presents the reasoning used to make the calculations used by the model)

C) Consequences (the rational consequences of the model --> I'm NOT sure that the reasoning expressed in this table is valid

D) Data ( the data and its source used to make the ratio between 'calculations' and 'observations')

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  • $\begingroup$ Of interest to you in your quest: The Internet Periodic Table Database. $\endgroup$ – Todd Minehardt Nov 13 '15 at 0:04
  • $\begingroup$ Topology has also been a weak mathematical area for me, but I don't think that sort of representation would help. The periodic table and the Aufbau diagram are the two keys used to introduce inorganic chemistry. I just don't comprehend how a Mobius strip would simplify either or combine either in some novel way. Science is always looking for new ideas, so if you have more concrete thoughts on this we'd be happy to critique them. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aufbau_principle $\endgroup$ – MaxW Nov 13 '15 at 2:08
  • $\begingroup$ Hi @MaxW it took me a while to go deep into the subject in order to present you "concrete thoughts" but I finally could summarize them into the following spreadsheet: onedrive.live.com/… The model has a R² = 0.9976 (what I think is pretty good as a first try) and, if the racionale (reasoning) is correct, the consequences seems pretty good to me. $\endgroup$ – Marc Rosenfeld Nov 23 '15 at 12:57
  • $\begingroup$ (continuing) please check the spreadsheet in the following order: A) Observation VS calculation B) Racionale ( that are the reasoning used to make the calculations used by the model) C) Consequences (the rational consequences of the model --> I'm NOT sure that the reasoning expressed in this table is valid D) Data ( the data and its source used to make the ratio between 'calculations' and 'observations') $\endgroup$ – Marc Rosenfeld Nov 23 '15 at 12:59
  • $\begingroup$ I don't have any idea of what you're trying to calculate in the spreadsheet. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Nov 23 '15 at 17:47

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