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Linus Pauling wrote the famous "Nature of the Chemical Bond" which is a Bible of sorts for valence bond theory.

However, VB theory was combined with crystal field theory to form molecular orbital theory, which eventually was condensed into the Hartree–Fock method.

Are there any "Bible" type reference books for these other methods?

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    $\begingroup$ F. A. Cotton's book "Chemical Applications of Group Theory" was the bible for crystal field theory in my college days. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Nov 11 '15 at 21:30
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    $\begingroup$ Ian Fleming's "Molecular Orbitals and Organic Chemical Reactions", two editions are published: a student version, and a longer, more detailed reference version. Both are excellent texts for understanding MO theory in Organic systems and reactions. $\endgroup$ – NotEvans. Nov 11 '15 at 22:15
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    $\begingroup$ @Dale - Yes there are forever "better" more rigorous books being published. Wikipedia in the early days used to be good for looking a basic explanation up. Now the articles have gotten so "rigorous" in terms of being absolutely right and using all the right terms that many are nearly impossible to understand. It almost seems like three levels are needed - a dummies level, an intermediate level, and a research level. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Nov 11 '15 at 23:54
  • $\begingroup$ @MaxW I have had that very thought on multiple occasions. $\endgroup$ – Dale Nov 12 '15 at 0:19
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    $\begingroup$ @MaxW There does seem to be a "Simple" Wikipedia: simple.wikipedia.org contains simplified versions of regular Wikipedia articles. $\endgroup$ – Dale Nov 17 '15 at 0:26
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I think an excellent book for understanding molecular orbital theory from a qualitative basis is Orbital Interactions in Chemistry by Albright, Burdett, and Whangbo. It covers a wide range of topics from molecules to solids.

The book doesn't go into particular methods, but instead illustrates how various MO treatments can understand a great deal of chemistry.

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    $\begingroup$ I also agree with the above comment that Fleming's book is very useful, but Albright, Burdett and Whangbo cover far more ground, particularly solids and inorganic/organometallics. $\endgroup$ – Geoff Hutchison Nov 12 '15 at 0:12
  • $\begingroup$ I absolutely agree with you. For me it is the best book about this topic I have encountered yet - an absolute masterpiece. $\endgroup$ – Philipp Nov 12 '15 at 0:22

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