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All substances have a freezing point at which they transition from a liquid to a solid. They all also have a melting point at which they transition from a solid to a liquid. However, as far as I can tell a substance only has a boiling point at which it transitions from a liquid into a gas. There is no analogous concept of a "condensation point" at which a gas transitions into a liquid. Why not?

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  • $\begingroup$ Melting point and freezing point really are the same thing and so are boiling point and condensation point. See here. $\endgroup$ – Philipp Oct 23 '15 at 14:18
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A "condensation point" is sort of a misdirection as to the physical process involved. "Point" is really a stand-in for "temperature."

Consider water in air. Let's say that the temp is 20 degrees C, but the "dew point" is 10 degrees C. So if the temperature drops to 10 degrees C then the air is saturated with water and and a further drop in temperature will result in the formation of dew. So being past the dew point is dependent on the amount of water in the air and the temperature, not just the temperature alone.

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Gases (such as $\ce{O2}$, $\ce{Br2}$, $\ce{N2}$, $\ce{F2}$) can be condensed in a chamber under specific conditions ( things like humidity, pressure, temperature) but the conditions rely on more than just temperature or one variable that could be called a condensation point.

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