1
$\begingroup$

Why is it that when you chop peanuts, a highly viscous paste is created?

Im assuming that the reason that chopped peanuts dont become just dust is because we cannot chop finely enough, but what causes the chopped particles to adhere to each other?

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Well, that's mostly fat, so... $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Oct 23 '15 at 10:00
  • $\begingroup$ To expand on @Mithoron's comment - the peanut is not a homogeneous substance. Instead, it is comprised of many compounds. Therefore, it can not be neatly subdivided to infinity. The peanut oils behave such that they will come out and make the slurry that we call peanut butter. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Oct 23 '15 at 14:16
1
$\begingroup$

Peanuts contain peanut oil. When you crush the peanut you also compress some of the peanut oil out out of the nut particles.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Ok so you now have some oil/solid mixture, so what? $\endgroup$
    – User2341
    Oct 24 '15 at 19:37
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Do the experiment. Try mixing some vegetable oil with flour. The flour doesn't dissolve, you just get a paste. $\endgroup$
    – MaxW
    Oct 24 '15 at 19:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.