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I have made the following image in paint, so forgive me if it isn't the most appealing sugar. I have a hard time visualizing how the following sugar is an aldose.

enter image description here

My speculation for the Fischer projection of the alleged carbohydrate is:

enter image description here

My speculation is as a result of the lack of primary alcohol at the end of traditional carbohydrates like D-glucose for example means that there is not carbon group alpha or beta to carbon 4 in the furanose ring. The fact that there is still a CHO group on Carbon 1 would make this sugar an aldose? Is this logic correct, and is that the Fischer projection for the sugar shown above in the Haworth projection?

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    $\begingroup$ The middle carbon in your Fisher projection should have $\ce{HO}$, not $\ce{OH}$. $\endgroup$ – Jan Oct 9 '15 at 9:35
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Yes its an aldose it is classified as an aldose because of the aldehyde group (cho). The compound is actually an aldotetrose called L-Threose. Try using acd Chem sketch program for the projection it is a free download for the freeware version...

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