2
$\begingroup$

Why does oxidized copper turn green? I am sorry if this question is too basic, but am really stumped here. It would be helpful if one could provide a research paper or website with your answer.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Copper oxide is not green, but green verdigris, basic copper carbonate (or acetate) forms on copper exposed to air and moisture.

Heating copper in air can form a near-transparent film of copper oxide, which can exhibit all the colors of the spectrum due to interference of light. The same effect cause a "rainbow" in oil slicks on water.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think this answers the question, just says how not why. I am imagining some kind of answer with d-orbitals. $\endgroup$ – user19026 Sep 20 '15 at 4:17
  • $\begingroup$ The question is a misstatement. Read it $\endgroup$ – DrMoishe Pippik Sep 20 '15 at 22:24
  • $\begingroup$ Huh, I still don't see it, it sounds like someone's asking for an explanation for the color change of copper when it's oxidized. Oxidized does not mean "gains oxygen". I think Aaron is trying to understand why copper carbonate and/or copper acetate are green. $\endgroup$ – user19026 Sep 21 '15 at 0:56
0
$\begingroup$

Copper when is exposed to air, it gets oxidized and a tarnish of green color is formed on it.As Cu is a transition metal, it possesses color according to the "crystal field theory". So, Cu reflects green color when it comes in contact with oxygen.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy