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Is de-Broglie wavelength different from wavelength of waves such as electromagnetic waves?

If yes, they differ in what respect?

And can we use the formula of wavelength of light ($c=v\lambda$) to calculate the de-Broglie wavelength?

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    $\begingroup$ de-broglie wavelength is the wavelength associated with a particle with mass. h/p=de-broglie wavelength, where p is momentum, h is planck's constant. $\endgroup$ Sep 9 '15 at 18:56
  • $\begingroup$ duplicate of chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/33460/… ? $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Sep 9 '15 at 20:31
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Is de-Broglie wavelength different from wavelength of waves such as electromagnetic waves?

I would atually say no, there is no difference, since the wavelength is purely mathematical characteristic of a wave, the distance over which the wave's shape repeats. There is, however, an important difference between de-Broglie waves on the one side and usual physical waves (mechanical & electromagnetic) on the other:

  • The later consist of periodic oscillations of a physical quantity, such as, for instance, the pressure for sound waves or electrical and magnetic fields for electromagnetic waves.

  • The former consist of periodic oscillations of a mathematical quantity, the probability of finding a particle at some location.

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