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I do not have any formal education in metallurgy, but I am trying to make a game mechanic based on it.

I need to be able to alloy together different metals and alloyable materials such as carbon in different percentages, and get an approximation of the strength and hardness of the resulting alloy. If anyone has any ideas how what I would need to do to calculate such a thing I would be very appreciative.

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closed as too broad by bon, user15489, ron, Klaus-Dieter Warzecha, Curt F. Aug 17 '15 at 3:27

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to chemistry.SE! If you had any questions about the policies of our community, please ‎visit the help center. $\endgroup$ – M.A.R. Aug 15 '15 at 18:35
  • $\begingroup$ Looks too broad - big part of metallurgy - even about steel there are lots of books. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Aug 15 '15 at 19:12
  • $\begingroup$ Hmm, @Mith I think the answer could boil down to introducing a general formula $\ldots$ and it doesn't need to be something specific. Are you sure there's no way for a short answer on this? $\endgroup$ – M.A.R. Aug 15 '15 at 19:37
  • $\begingroup$ @inɒzɘmɒЯ.A.M Looks like Todd managed to do this generally enough ;) $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Aug 15 '15 at 20:15
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Look at the free resource provided at MatWeb.

Under the Physical Properties tab, you can choose up to 3 of them from a rather extensive list, including hardness. For example, I chose "Carbon" and "Hardness, Rockwell R," and 25 results were returned.

Under the Alloy Composition tab, you can choose up to 3 elements and percentages for your alloy, and see if you get a hit. I chose "Nonferrous Metal" and carbon (minimum 5%, maximum 75%) and silicon (minimum 5%, maximum 75%), and got one hit.

I believe for your purposes, you can assemble a list of materials by hardness and strength (I'm not a metallurgist either, so you might have to do some research on which of the hardness and strength metrics you'll need to choose) and/or by selecting by composition (again, you might need to research which 2- and 3-element combinations make sense and which ones don't).

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