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Being an ionic solid, salt is very susceptible to being torn apart by the polar molecules of water. Inside the water, salt exists as sodium and chlorine anions; but what state of matter is it in?
My instinct tells me it is in a solid state, as salt's melting point is 800°C, but it sure doesn't really act like a solid.

EDIT: I think I ought to rephrase, I mean what state of matter are the individual sodium and chlorine ions inside the water.

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marked as duplicate by M.A.R., ron, bon, Loong, user15489 Jul 29 '15 at 19:30

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  • $\begingroup$ It's simply liquid solution! I have no idea why tou'd think otherwise $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jul 29 '15 at 16:09
  • $\begingroup$ The salt is liquid? Really? At room temperature? $\endgroup$ – HyperLuminal Jul 29 '15 at 16:18
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    $\begingroup$ Phase is macroscopic - "state of matter are the individual sodium and chlorine ions inside the water" has no sense when salt is dissolving it simply becomes part of liquid mixture - that's it. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jul 29 '15 at 16:25
  • $\begingroup$ Could you turn that into an answer and provide references? @Mithoron $\endgroup$ – HyperLuminal Jul 29 '15 at 16:27
  • $\begingroup$ chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/308/… may answer it even better $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jul 29 '15 at 16:44