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Is there any reaction between solid/ liquid elements/compounds at room temperature that produces gases??

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closed as off-topic by Klaus-Dieter Warzecha, tschoppi, Ben Norris, jerepierre, ron May 17 '15 at 22:25

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    $\begingroup$ Lots, for example, solid magnesium in aqueous hydrochloric acid can releases hydrogen gas. $\endgroup$ – user15489 May 17 '15 at 19:10
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    $\begingroup$ You seem to be implying that you don't think this should be the case. As @santiago said the complete opposite is true. Perhaps you could give us some more detail about why you are asking the question? $\endgroup$ – bon May 17 '15 at 19:11
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Yes, there are many. One you can make in your kitchen is to mix baking soda and vinegar; it makes carbon dioxide gas.

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    $\begingroup$ There are more than several. There are a vast number. $\endgroup$ – bon May 17 '15 at 19:21
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There is an incredible amount of such reactions. Consider the equation from thermodynamics,

ΔG = ΔH - TΔS

where

ΔG is change in Free Energy

ΔH is change in Enthalpy

T is Temperature and

ΔS is change in Entropy.

It is known that a reaction is spontaneous and favorable if ΔG is negative. We therefore see that a reaction that increases entropy (ΔS > 0) will be more likely to be favorable. Although not quite technically correct, Entropy can be thought of as a measure of disorder. Therefore, if a reaction results in products that are more chaotic than the reactants, it will be more likely to be favored.

A reaction of solids, liquids, or both that produce a gas will increase the entropy of the system. This is because gasses are much more chaotic and unordered than solids or liquids. Therefore, there will be not just many, but an unfathomably large number of reactions that will take place at room temperature that will spontaneously occur.

And if the reaction results in a release of heat (ΔH < 0), then it is guaranteed to occur at any temperature if it produces gas in this way.

Some examples include explosives, in which much gas is produced at incredible rates. Acid-metal reactions produce Hydrogen gas as well.

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    $\begingroup$ I doubt the OP understands the thermodynamic aspect at all, else the question would not have been asked in the first case. $\endgroup$ – user223679 May 18 '15 at 4:23
  • $\begingroup$ @user223679 I was thinking that may have been the case so I tried to explain it as well as I could. $\endgroup$ – Nerdatope May 18 '15 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ Yes. No doubt about your answer quality. Just that it could be a bit too much for the OP. Anyway, future visitors will benefit from it :) $\endgroup$ – user223679 May 18 '15 at 18:24
  • $\begingroup$ @user223679 Thanks, but one question, what does OP stand for? $\endgroup$ – Nerdatope May 18 '15 at 18:26
  • $\begingroup$ Good question. I use OP for Original Poster but it varies throughout SE and other communities. Some go with Original Post. Look here. Btw, where are you from? $\endgroup$ – user223679 May 18 '15 at 18:33

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