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I am looking for a book or website such as "Vogel's Textbook of Quantitative Chemical Analysis" where I can find methods for analyzing/standardizing a particular species easily.

I am not looking for an exact sub area such as water analysis or drug analysis; rather I want a resource like Vogel's which indexes generic analytical methods, both classical and modern.

Edit: Actually I am looking for the method of standardizing a sodium thiosulfate solution using a potassium dichromate solution. I can't find the method in "Vogel's Textbook of Quantitative Chemical Analysis 6th Edition".

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My go-to for this is typically Kolthoff & Sandell's Textbook of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. They unfortunately do not report a detailed protocol for dichromate standardization of thiosulfate solutions therein, but instead cite Volumetric Analysis, Vol III by Kolthoff and Stenger (Amazon and Google Books). I don't have access to this volume; WorldCat shows numerous copies in university libraries in my area of the U.S.; more than likely there's a library where you are that has a copy.

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  • $\begingroup$ @chemkatku Sure! I was rather surprised that K&S didn't have it in detail. It must be that authors are either considering it an obsolete method, or so commonplace that it's not needed to include any more. $\endgroup$ – hBy2Py May 15 '15 at 11:06
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Book:

I can find one book which should have analytical methods for most of the species.

Encyclopedia of Separation Science

It is ten volume set.

websites:

There are too many websites on internet but I will choose following two:

  1. Chemistry Stack Exchange

  2. Wikipedia

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks. Encyclopedia of Separation Science is great. But I want some resource that indexes analytical methods. $\endgroup$ – chemkatku May 14 '15 at 7:38
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Finally I found the book I was looking for. The method is listed in "Vogel's Textbook of Chemical Analysis 5th Edition" (page 392). They have removed it from the 6th edition.

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