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Is time a measurement of entropy? Is it because time is increasing forever?

Well after reading about the Second Law of Thermodynamics and working with Entropy, I began to realize that if time can be interpreted as a measure of Entropy, since it is always increasing.

Since almost everything decays with time, I thought that time could be a measure of Entropy. Since it is achieving the lowest energy state possible.

Thanks

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    $\begingroup$ Could you elaborate and improve your question? Right now it looks like you thought too much about II law of thermodynamics ;) $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Apr 10 '15 at 22:46
  • $\begingroup$ Yep, you seem to be confused... Is it connected with the most common problem with thermodynamics, like: chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/24669/… ? $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Apr 10 '15 at 23:58
  • $\begingroup$ yeah, It is kind of measure of entropy $\endgroup$ Apr 11 '15 at 16:16
  • $\begingroup$ Related fun fact: numb3rs.wolfram.com/511 $\endgroup$ May 22 '15 at 4:09
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Time and entropy has not much to do with each other.

From practical point of view: Equilibrium systems can hang around for infinite time, and their entropy does not change at all - so time would be an impractical measure.

From conceptual point of view: Entropy comes from statistical behavior of the system of many bodies. Time is unrelated to statistics; it exist even in single body systems.

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