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I did the iodine clock reaction using sodium metabisulfite and potassium iodate. As I understand it, increasing concentration is supposed to speed up your reaction rate. I did 10 trials. The first 5 I varied the concentration of metabisulfite and kept the iodate constant. Trials 6-10 I varied the potassium iodate and kept the meta constant. I don't understand why as I increased concentration, the reaction rate became slower? For example in trial 6 I had 2 ml of sodium metabisulfite and 4 ml of potassium iodate, that only took 7 seconds. In trial 10 I had 2 ml of meta and 10 ml of potassium iodate and that took 17 seconds? Does anyone know what I did wrong? Increasing concentrations should have increased collisions and made the rate faster, but it did the opposite! Please help me figure out why things went wrong!

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The theory is correct. Increasing concentrations increase the number of effective collisions per unit time and the rate increases. So accordingly even in the experiment it should happen like that.

So in visualizing your situation, it must have been an experimental error and not the theory. (Say there must have been less amount of $\ce{H2O2}$ in the mixture).

In this reaction what happens first is the conversion of $\ce{I-}$ to $\ce{I2}$ (have to add $\ce{H2O2}$). This $\ce{I2}$ will then react with metabisulphite or (even sodium thiosulphate) to produce $\ce{I-}$. Since you have added a constant value of meta in trials 6-10 there is a definite amount of $\ce{I2}$ removed in each trial by meta then the remaining $\ce{I2}$ will react with starch to give the color change.

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