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I'm working on an imaging project and I have no background in chemistry or chemiluminescence for that matter. This is a Computer Science project.

While most of the details for it have been worked out, I'm having difficulty figuring out the scope and possibility of an important requirement.

Given a luminol image, I will develop a heat-map. For now the heat map is built based upon the intensity of the light.

However, given the intensity of the light and with the knowledge that luminol is being used, is it possible to determine the approximate temperature of the point based on its intensity and the intensity of the surrounding region?

I would assume that this chemical would burn differently at various temperature and would have a specific signature of light emitted depending on it its temperature but I'm having difficulty pinpointing whether this is true, possible and backed by research (or science).

The closest parallel I've found is combustion analysis. The heat release rate is calculated by measuring the amount of light radiated from a flame at various wavelengths, since certain chemicals give off radiations at specific wavelengths.

Can anyone confirm this, suggest alternatives or point me int the right direction?

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However, given the intensity of the light and with the knowledge that luminol is being used, is it possible to determine the approximate temperature of the point based on its intensity and the intensity of the surrounding region?

Probably not! The energy released from the excited state of the 3-aminophthalate dianion formed in the oxidation of luminol (or rather its dianion) by hydrogen peroxide in alkaline is released in form of light. There's little to no heat released in this chemoluminescent reaction.

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There is some research out there, e.g.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3749789, Influence of pH and temperature on luminol-dependent chemiluminescence and

http://pelagiaresearchlibrary.com/der-chemica-sinica/vol4-iss3/DCS-2013-4-3-161-164.pdf, Effect of temperature on chemiluminescence of luminol ethyl amine.

Note that there is also a time dependency, so that increased luminous output is offset by shorter duration.

That's an interesting use of chemiluminescence and implies use of tomography if the sample is three-dimensional.

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