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I'm taking chem classes, and am interested in learning a some biochem on the side, on my own. I've bee looking for a decent book, though I'm on a bit of a tight budget so not brand shiny new ones upwards of a hundred. Hopefully. Obviously I don't want something ancient just for reduced price, so two questions. How many years back is ok to use as a cutoff for publication date, and any suggestions?

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    $\begingroup$ Lehninger's book is really something to consider. We study it for our chemistry olympiad, so it's worth noting, isn't it? $\endgroup$ – It's Over Feb 15 '15 at 21:20
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I would suggest the Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, which is one of the best in my opinion since it covers most of the key aspects in biochemistry. It is quite expensive to buy as new, but since it is quite common you can maybe borrow it from a library. In this way you can get an impression about the book and eventually decide if it is worth buying it or not. If you are interested in having it I would buy a secondhand one and I would say it does not matter if it is not the last version, the previous one should be good as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ That's actually one I was looking at myself. The last edition is pretty cheap too. Looking through the preview to get a bit of a look at it now. $\endgroup$ – Caesium-133 Feb 15 '15 at 22:01
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I had to read biochemistry by berg. I think the 7th edition is the latest one, but you can't go wrong with the sixth either. This is a good text to get a general overview of biochemistry that you can later apply to research systems in the future.

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    $\begingroup$ I took the class biochemistry last year so both books are pretty new. $\endgroup$ – xmfm45 Feb 15 '15 at 19:48
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I know you are asking for a textbook, but if you want to do some casual learning here are a few pop-sci biochemistry-focused books that I recommend giving a try:

  • Oxygen by Nick Lane. I like this book best but any of Nick Lane's books would be a good start. This one focuses on the profound changes oxygen has had on life on Earth, from evolution to biochemistry.
  • Blondes in Venetian Paintings... by Konrad Bloch. A series of essays on completely different topics, all recounting various aspects of the Nobel-winning career of a great biochemist.
  • The Chemicals of Life by Isaac Asimov(!). Sure this one is very dated but by all accounts it's extremely well written. (I haven't read this one yet myself but it's on my list.)
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  • $\begingroup$ Cool, thanks. Can always use something a bit lighter/non text book to read while still sticking with science. $\endgroup$ – Caesium-133 Feb 15 '15 at 21:58

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