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The Wikipedia article titled Solubility table states that

The table below provides information on the variation of solubility of different substances (mostly inorganic compounds) in water with temperature, at 1 atmosphere pressure.

Why does pressure have an effect of on solubility?

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It comes from a combination of Henry's law and Le Châtelier's principle. Henry's law is $$p=k_hc$$ where $p$ is the partial pressure of the gas, $k_h$ is the Henry's law constant and $c$ is the concentration of the gas (because liquids and solids are not affected as much as gases, if at all). This means that with a greater pressure comes a greater concentration, and with a lower pressure comes a lesser concentration, and vice versa

Le Châtelier's principle states that if the pressure, concentration, temperature or volume of a system changes, something else will change to compensate and swing the whole thing back into equilibrium. If there is a greater pressure, there will therefore be a grater concentration. A greater concentration means there is a greater solubility.

The UC Davis Chem Wiki (I didn't see that DrMoishe Pippik had linked to it until after I posted this!) is rather helpful - much more helpful than Wikipedia, in this case.

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Pressure has a strong effect on the solubility of gases, of course, "forcing" them into solution; see http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Physical_Chemistry/Equilibria/Solubilty/Solubility_and_Factors_Affecting_Solubility.

But even solution of solids in liquids are affected somewhat by pressure: for example, proteins may be denatured and made less soluble by high pressure, as in ocean deeps. See http://www.desy.de/news/@@news-view?id=4561&lang=eng for information on that.

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