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Let's say $\ce{Fe}$ reacts with $\ce{Cu^{2+}}$ ions. $\ce{Fe}$ would oxidize and therefore give electrons to $\ce{Cu^{2+}}$so that:

$$\ce{Fe-> Fe^{2+} +2e-}$$ $$\ce{Cu^{2+} +2e^- ->Cu}$$ The overall reaction:

$$\ce{Cu^{2+} +Fe ->Cu +Fe^{2+}}$$

Now this is an example of corrosion, right? And when this type of corrosion happens, the anode is the electrode where oxidation happens and the cathode is the electrode where reduction happens, right? Therefore iron ($\ce{Fe}$) is the anode where oxidation happens and Copper 2+ ions ($\ce{Cu^{2+}}$) is the cathode where the reduction happens.

My question is, is this all correct? Have I successfully described corrosion (of this type) and given an example of it? Or is there something wrong? I'm 15 and soon I'm having a test in chemistry, and because of my age there's no point in making it "super-advanced", but if there's something I missed or did wrong please point it out, I would be grateful for that!

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    $\begingroup$ There are some problems with charges in your equation, and this type of reaction isn't what is typically called corrosion. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Feb 1 '15 at 17:01
  • $\begingroup$ @Mithoron: Weird, I think my teacher said this qualified as corrosion.. Also I know that $Fe$ + $Cu$$^+$$^2$ $>$ $Cu + Fe$$^+$$^2$, I did a mistake. EDIT: Is this not qualified as corrosion as the metal doesn't change according to natural circumstances? $\endgroup$ – didnotcomeuptosomething Feb 1 '15 at 17:21
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    $\begingroup$ I checked and indeed something like this can happen in galvanic corrosion $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Feb 1 '15 at 17:33
  • $\begingroup$ @Mithoron: So does that mean that this example is a correct example of galvanic corrosion? I'll ask my teacher too of course if this is acceptable. EDIT: And is this description good enough when explaining galvanic corrosion? $\endgroup$ – didnotcomeuptosomething Feb 1 '15 at 17:38
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    $\begingroup$ Fe is probably oxidized to +3, otherwise I see no problem. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Feb 1 '15 at 17:47
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You are right! What you have written is an example of Galvanic corrosion (Galvanic corrosion occurs when two different metals have physical or electrical contact with each other and are immersed in a common electrolyte). You have successfully described Galvanic corrosion and given an example of it

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