3
$\begingroup$

When using hydrazine as a reduction agent to reduce graphene oxide, which is the product hydrazine oxidises to?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

I'm sorry for the wrong answer initially given; you might consider to unaccept this one.

I'm not sure whether this has ever been examined in detail. It is likely that nobody bothered to collect the (volatile) reaction products of hydrazine.

According to a procedure provided by the group of Rodney Ruoff (DOI), the reduction was performed in an open flask equipped with a reflux condenser. An aqueous suspension GO was first sonicated (to support exfoliation) until it became clear, then hydrazine hydrate was added and the mixture refluxed at 100 °C for 24 hours. During this time, the reduction product precipitated as a black solid.

No remarks on what actually happened to the hydrazine were given in this article.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ If hydrazine is acting as a reducing agent, then it should be oxidized during the reaction. $\endgroup$ – jerepierre Jan 26 '15 at 13:33
  • $\begingroup$ @jerepierre You're absolutely right. I was thinking in oxidative degradation of carboxylates, which has nothing to do with the question asked. $\endgroup$ – Klaus-Dieter Warzecha Jan 26 '15 at 13:40
-1
$\begingroup$

The decomposition reaction of hydrazine ($\ce{N2H4}$) is as below: $$\ce{N2H4 \rightarrow N2H2 + H2}$$

The forming $\ce{H2}$ will reduce the graphene oxide and hydrazine itself oxidises to $\ce{N2H2}$.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ So, why not use H2 in the first place? $\endgroup$ – Georg Jan 27 '15 at 10:53
  • $\begingroup$ To avoid contaminating the graphene with metals I suspect. $\endgroup$ – Beerhunter May 27 '17 at 16:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.