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I have no clue whatsoever about Chemistry on a academic point of view.

We wish to transport some goods. Let's say we vacuum some of those goods, by doing like so:

We place those goods on a box, we close the box, and then we vacuum seal the box (not the goods).

Can we consider the goods to be vacuum protected?

Does that mean, that no hight heat will affect those goods?

Thank you in advance, and sorry for not using specific chemical terminology.

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    $\begingroup$ Please attach simple schematics of your idea and add few more details on goods, heat and how would you vacuum seal. $\endgroup$ – ssavec Jan 21 '15 at 10:23
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to chemistry.se! If you have questions about how to beautify your posts, have a look at the help center. Do you want to know more about this site, please take the tour. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Jan 21 '15 at 10:43
  • $\begingroup$ I have no clue on what schematics does you expect sorry. The thing is, we wish to ship something, for example, fresh herbs. Those herbs should not be exposed to high temperatures during the shipping process. By high I don't mean 300ºC or something. I presume it will never be hooter then 50ºC. What I'm trying to understand is: If we place the fresh herbs on a box, let's say, a regular plastic box, we close the box, and then we vacuum seal the box with some material, using a vacuum sealer bag, will the contents inside that box, be considered sealed? $\endgroup$ – Marcio Jan 21 '15 at 10:54
  • $\begingroup$ Klaus's answer exactly shows my point. Is the box itself airtight? The herbs are freely lying on the bottom of the box? Would the herbs profit from being kept in vacuum, compared to air? (U would guess they will). Or is the thermal insulation the main point? Than see e.g. spacaky.cz/thermopack_eng.htm $\endgroup$ – ssavec Jan 21 '15 at 12:12
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Let's imagine that your transport box has a decently closing lid. It you place the herbs in the box, close the lid , stuff the box into a vacuum sealer bag, remove the air from the bag until it is shrunk around the box and finally seal it, you may consider it sealed.

This means:

  1. According to "household standards", it is air-tight to the outside. No air from the environment will enter the bag, unless it is damaged.

  2. There is however still air in the box. Whatever degradation, loss of flavour, etc. may happen to the herbs during transport still can, since there is oxygen.

However, if you vaccum-seal the box, or replace the air in the box with nitrogen, you will minimize (or fully prevent) degradation of the herbs.

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I know this is an old post but I hope I can still help. It would be a very bad idea to vacuum pack fresh herbs for shipping. From a chemical stand point, the living herb are respiring and so releasing CO2. Cold shipment will be needed to lower the rate of respiration, check the Q10 for the herbs you are shipping, or a not air-tight container. Look at the packaging in a grocery store, they are not air-tight. From a microbiological view, you want to place fresh herbs (may have some soil still on them), that most likely have not been irradiated (best way to kill microbes on food), into an anaerobic environment. Research Clostridium botulinum and you will see why this is a bad idea.

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After vacuum cleaning of goods which you are mentioning.. there is still a chance of entry of gases during the packing time. If you are good enough to manage the goods vacuum protected until packing then your goods will be vacuum protected if you vacuum seal the box perfectly..

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