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Water ionization becomes much less evident if the hydrogen bonds are just a few percent stronger but pure water contains considerably more $\ce{H+}$ ions if they are few percent weaker.

I found this line in some article. You can even copy/paste this line on search bar of Google. I didn't understood the latter part of this statement which is "but pure water contains considerably more $\ce{H+}$ ions if they are few percent weaker". The author is indicating to which of the following three situations?

  1. only $\ce{H+}$ ion concentration will increase
  2. both $\ce{H+}$ and $\ce{OH-}$ will increase
  3. $\ce{H+}$ will increase and $\ce{OH-}$ will decrease that is the equilibrium constant remains same.
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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry could you rephrase the section in the middle as it is very unclear and confusing. Also what do you mean by 'H=' $\endgroup$
    – bon
    Jan 6 '15 at 18:18
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The article by Martin Chaplin 'Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength' (arXiv:0706.1355 [cond-mat.soft], no evidence of peer review) is discussing how changes to the properties of water would alter life.

If the hydrogen bonding in water was stronger, there would be less ionization (less $\ce{H+}$ and less $\ce{OH-}$).

If the hydrogen bonding in water was weaker, there would be more ionization (more $\ce{H+}$ and more $\ce{OH-}$).

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