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I'm writing a report based on testing I've done on a material. I'm wondering if there is any convention on using different nomenclature for isopropanol. Which way of writing this molecule is consider the most accepted or the most "correct?"

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    $\begingroup$ The answer depends on the audience. For theoretical, more nomenclature inclined chemists, I would use the preferred IUPAC name propan-2-ol, but technicians would probably use isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Nov 11, 2023 at 5:52

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Many compounds can have more than one systematic IUPAC name. A compound may be named correctly in two or more ways in accordance with the several methods recommended by IUPAC.

However, “isopropanol” is one of the rare cases of a widespread name that is actually considered wrong and not just not preferred.

Designations such as isopropanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol are incorrect because there are no hydrocarbons isopropane, sec-butane, and tert-butane to which the suffix "-ol" can be added; such names should be abandoned.

Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry (The IUPAC 'Blue Book'), Sections A, B, C, D, E, F, and H. Oxford: Pergamon Press. 1979.

Isopropyl alcohol, however, is correct but not preferred.

Isopropyl alcohol, sec-butyl alcohol, and tert-butyl alcohol are, however, permissible (see Rule C-201.3) because the radicals isopropyl, sec-butyl, and tert-butyl do exist.

– ibid.

The preferred name in accordance with the current version of Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry – IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book) is propan-2-ol.

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