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I am aware of the redox chemistry that happens at the electrode surface, but I'm not sure how exactly a change in electrical potential in the solution would change the potential in the electrode?

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  • $\begingroup$ The best explanation I found is the beginning of chapter 5 of the textbook "Medical Instrumentation: Application and Design". $\endgroup$
    – Anthony
    Aug 14, 2023 at 5:17
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    $\begingroup$ Before raising a question, check if the initial premises are true, otherwise it would be climbing a ladder leaning at a wrong roof. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Aug 14, 2023 at 9:09
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    $\begingroup$ Note that the potential of any electrode is considered relative to present or assumed SHE, both floating wrt the the potential of the solution. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Aug 14, 2023 at 12:15

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It all come down to attractions of electrons to various nuclei. In the case of electrodes there must be intimate mixing of all components so that the transfer of electrons is kinetically facile. It tends to be an art. A potential develops between the cathode, reduction, reaction and the anode, oxidation, reaction and if there is electrical connection current will flow allowing the reactions to occur. The single electrode potential between the Ag and Ag+ ions has been difficult to measure. [So far, I think, impossible.]

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