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The nucleus of tritium (hydrogen-3, $\ce{^3H})$ contains one proton and two neutrons. Nothing repulsive is acting on the proton that can make the nucleus unstable. Then why does it decay?

I suspect the answer is related to the internal structure of the protons and neutrons. This applies as well to the one with the greater number of neutrons than it should be. My question applies to those isotopes as well.

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    $\begingroup$ It is just 1 special case among hundreds other cases of radioactive beta decay. // Pay more attention to prior search before asking. // Review the guides Asking and How to ask to prevent misunderstanding, need of clarification, objections, downvoting or closure. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 10:40
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    $\begingroup$ Note that there is a semi-empirical rule that elements with odd proton number have maximally 2 stable isotopes. And another rule, if there are 2 isotopes of neighbor elements with the same nucleon number, maximally one is stable ( the one with lower energy). $\ce{^3He}$ has lower energy than $\ce{^3H}$. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 10:43
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    $\begingroup$ The neutron is an inherently unstable subatomic particle. An isolated neutron decays with a half-life of about 10 minutes. The real surprise is that, in atomic nuclei, the neutron decay rate can be suppressed by 20 orders of magnitude or more. $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 10:48
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    $\begingroup$ Nothing repels the proton. That refers to the electrostatic/electromagnetic force. Radioactivity is driven by the internuclear forces. $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 11:33
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    $\begingroup$ physics.stackexchange.com/questions/303657/… $\endgroup$
    – M06-2x
    Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 14:57

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