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I've been working on a project that uses some abnormal methods to calculate the activation energy using only one trial of an exothermic reaction.

However now that I've completed the lab, I want to find a literature value or at least another lab which calculated the activation energy before. Balanced equation below:

$$\ce{MgCO3(s) + 2HCl(aq) -> MgCl2(aq) + CO2(g) + H2O(l)}$$

I've checked through all of the responses to Is there a database on chemical reactions, similar to NIST, but far more complete? However, all the replies focused on organic chemistry or purely gaseous reactions.

Where can I find a database or lab which measured the activation energy of similar/the same reaction?

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    $\begingroup$ Then better use something in your project that has actual chance of working, as far as Ea is concerned. Like a reaction between things in the same phase. $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Feb 18, 2023 at 19:44
  • $\begingroup$ Is there any "activation energy" (above a ground state) at all? This is an acid/base reaction. There does not seem to be any rate limiting step at all, rate would be based on concentration of reactants. However 2 H2 + O2 -> 2 H2O is reversible at high enough temperatures (and does have an Ea). This may be more what you are after. One interesting possibility: would HCl react with MgCO3 at near absolute zero temperatures? $\endgroup$ Feb 18, 2023 at 22:16
  • $\begingroup$ Robert DiGiovanni - I was under the impression that everything technically had an activation energy because at absolute zero (theoretically) there could be no reaction because nothing was moving. Therefore there has to be activation energy, even for an exothermic reaction, just to get started. $\endgroup$
    – Redmac
    Feb 19, 2023 at 2:11
  • $\begingroup$ Mithoron - if I assume that the MgCO3 had to dissolve in the water before reacting, then is there a way to find the Ea of MgCO3(aq) and HCl(aq)? $\endgroup$
    – Redmac
    Feb 19, 2023 at 2:11

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