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I am trying to make a solution of heptane and chloroform that matches the density of water.

Is this something which must be done experimentally as it is generally unpredictable? Does a software exist to computationally simulate this?

My end goal is to have a vertical interface rather than a horizontal one and then to make a pickering emulsion.

Thanks

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    $\begingroup$ As a "first shot" prediction, assume density as linear interpolation of solvent densities, according to their mass fraction. If it does not fit, determine the real density (e.g. weighting of measured volume) and use it as the 3rd point for quadratic interpolation to get the water density. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Feb 17, 2023 at 14:11
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    $\begingroup$ materials.springer.com/thermophysical/docs/ve1_c47c91 has data $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Feb 17, 2023 at 14:13

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Thanks to Jon Custer, now you have a full set of densities against mole fractions of chloroform and n-heptane mixtures in this site. Just for my curiosity, I have plot the relevant graph:

CCl3-heptane densities

The data is given for temperature at $\pu{25 ^\circ C}$ and the set is in good agreement $(R^2 = 0.9994)$. Since $x$ in the equation is the density, and assuming density of water at $\pu{25 ^\circ C}$ is $\pu{1.0 g mL-1}$, you may get that density by mixing $(-1.1887 + 3.727 - 1.9736) = 0.5647$ mole fraction.

I also found a reliable full data set of densities against mole fractions of chloroform and n-hexane mixtures as well (Ref.1). Just in case if you want to use hexane instead of heptane, I included that as well:

CCl3-hexane densities


Reference:

  1. Mehdi Hasan, Ujjan B. Kadam, Apoorva P. Hiray, and Arun B. Sawant, "Densities, Viscosities, and Ultrasonic Velocity Studies of Binary Mixtures of Chloroform with Pentan-1-ol, Hexan-1-ol, and Heptan-1-ol at (303.15 and 313.15) K," J. Chem. Eng. Data 2006, 51(2), 671–675 (DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/je0504459).
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