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Is there a difference between the distillation temperature and the boiling point of a fluid, in my case kerosene? And if there is, what is the difference?

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    $\begingroup$ Describe in details your search or understanding failure, what may help against the question closure. As vaque general description of effort is frequently a placeholder for no effort. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Jan 20, 2023 at 15:20
  • $\begingroup$ Kerosene is a mixture of many compounds. It doesn't have a single well-defined boiling point, but a wide range over which different components will distill off. In this case there will be no well defined temperature for distillation nor a single boiling point. $\endgroup$
    – matt_black
    Jan 21, 2023 at 16:55

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Both depend on the composition of your sample (keyword Raoult's law), as well as the external pressure.

One may argue the term boiling point leans more toward the characterization of a compound (e.g., water) with a denomination like $bp = \pu{100 ^\circ{}C} (\pu{1 atm})$.

On the other hand, distillation temperature leans more toward the (technical) application of distillations in synthesis and chemical engineering (large scale distillation, steam cracker, etc) as a unit operation. Here, temperature and pressure are set as process parameters, e.g. solvent x was removed from the reaction mixture by distillation at a pressure of $\approx \pu{10 mbar}$ and $\pu{80 ^\circ{}C}$, or to yield blends of a distillate (e.g., kerosene) for which only a range of boiling points is provided (e.g., petrol ether of $40\ldots\pu{60 ^\circ{}C}$).

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Boiling point and distillation point are similar if we take a glance but the significant difference among them..

  1. Boiling point

When a liquid starts converting into its gaseous state and the constant transition temperature is boiling point.

  1. Distillation temperature

On the other hand distillation temperature is used while distillation process where only the temperature of a substance that you want to yield is considered in a mixture with other substances.

in plain words boiling point is a characteristic property of a substance

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