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I am not a chemist myself but I am trying to solve a practical problem I am experiencing.

I have a nicely working diesel stove but it produces some smell. I've read that adding urea to the exhaust may reduce the diesel specific smell? Is that true?

Also what other common (easy to find) chemicals can supress the specific smell of burning diesel? What about potassium permanganate for example? Is urea the best chemical to supress these smells or there are others which can do better?

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    $\begingroup$ depends on the specific setup of the burner and the causes of the smell. Urea is used in cars to reduce NOx in the exhaust but isn't just added to the diesel but injected into the post catalytic converter exhaust in a controlled way. $\endgroup$
    – matt_black
    Nov 15, 2022 at 14:44
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    $\begingroup$ A vent with sufficient draw. Many diesel-fuel stoves have 12 VDC vent fan to help. $\endgroup$ Nov 15, 2022 at 20:16
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    $\begingroup$ Chemicals generally don't reduce each other's smell. At best, they stun your senses so that you stop feeling the other smell, much like shooting yourself in the leg makes you forget about your sore tooth. A dubious remedy, though. $\endgroup$ Nov 17, 2022 at 19:24

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First off try low sulfur diesel, or better yet: kerosene.

Next try and find a catalytic converter, perhaps off an old Colman heater or maybe at your local wood burning stove store. Cats do the same wonders in stoves as they have done in automobiles.

NOx should not be too much of an issue if the stove if properly vented. Try kerosene first.

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