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This doesn't come off from a question but it came to my mind. Take an example of $NH_4Cl$ as the salt and $NaOH$ as the strong base. What would happen to the pH for example? I'm guessing that the salt would dissociate $$NH_4 Cl\rightarrow NH_4^+ + Cl^-$$ $$c_0 \ \ \ \ \ c_0 \ \ \ \ c_0$$ and then the $NH_4$ would hidrolise like this: $$NH_4^+ +H_2O\rightarrow NH_3+H_3O^+$$ and then the hydroxide sodium would dissociate into hidroxide to find the pH? Not sure what would happen

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    $\begingroup$ You can format chemical substances and reactions using "mhchem" notation. For instance write $\ce{NH+4 +H2O->NH3 + H3O+}$ as \$\ce{NH+4 +H2O->NH3 + H3O+}\$. $\endgroup$
    – Buck Thorn
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 14:59
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    $\begingroup$ Also, please browse the site for similar questions. What you describe (as the answer correctly points out) is the reaction of a weak acid with a strong base. Use the search bar to start a search: chemistry.stackexchange.com/… $\endgroup$
    – Buck Thorn
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 15:00
  • $\begingroup$ Convenient reference for text/formula formatting: Notation basics / Formatting of math/chem expressions / upright vs italic // For more: Math SE MathJax tutorial. // Not to be applied in CH SE titles. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Oct 22, 2022 at 7:41

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Sodium hydroxide would dissociate into sodium cation and hydroxide anion. Hydroxide anion would react with both $\ce{NH4+}$ cation and $\ce{H+}$ cation because of their strength ($\ce{OH-}$ is a strong base).

So as you can see $\ce{NH4Cl}$ is an acid salt because the solution that remains after its addition into water contains $\ce{H+}$ produced from the hydrolysis of ammonium cation. Therefore if you add NaOH that is a strong base it will end up as a basic solution. In spite of the final solution you can calculate both pOH and pH when information are provided.

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    $\begingroup$ Please check spelling, correct use of chemical nomenclature, and use mhchem formatting as need be. For instance write $\ce{NH4+}$ as \$\ce{NH4+}$. For more on formatting see: chemistry.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/86/… $\endgroup$
    – Buck Thorn
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 14:55
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. English is not my first language and I am newbie here. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 15:16
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    $\begingroup$ Your English is not the issue (in fact, it's pretty good), chemical notations and overall formatting are (which are international). Chemical names are common nouns, not proper ones. Symbols for chemical elements follow strict capitalization rules not allowing arbitrary use of capital letters. Charges and indices must be properly formatted in order to avoid ambiguity, hence recommendation to use mhchem. $\endgroup$
    – andselisk
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 15:35

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