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For example, Barium Phosphate is soluble in dilute mineral acids. Does that also mean that it is also soluble in concentrated form of those acids?

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Well. Barium phosphate $\ce{Ba3(PO4)2}$ is not soluble at all in sulfuric acid $\ce{H2SO4}$ solutions, whatever their concentrations, because it forms barium sulfate $\ce{BaSO4}$ which is an insoluble compound. On the other hand it is soluble in diluted solutions of hydrochloric acid, according to $$\ce{Ba3(PO4)2 + 6 HCl -> 3 BaCl2 + 2 H3PO4}$$ Unfortunately it is not soluble in concentrated $\ce{HCl}$ solutions, because it produces some barium chloride $\ce{BaCl2}$ which has the strange property of being insoluble in concentrated $\ce{HCl}$ solutions, as the solubility product of $\ce{BaCl2}$ is exceeded.

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    $\begingroup$ Interesting facts that outline what a broad question that is... $\endgroup$ Jun 20 at 18:46
  • $\begingroup$ Exceeding the solubility product means just that, it does not mean insolubility; it just informs you what the solubility is. Sodium chloride [saturated] is precipitated by adding gaseous HCl. $\endgroup$
    – jimchmst
    Jun 20 at 19:25

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