-5
$\begingroup$

Are Nitogen Dioxide (NO2) & Nitrogen Peroxide (NO2) one & the same?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to the chemistry site of the StackExchange (SE) network. Be aware that laconic, not elaborated questions are usually closed on the SE. The site expects that you include the compact summary of your related current knowledge, involving your conclusion of searching for existing related info or answers. It would prevent others to tell you what you already know or what you could easily find yourself. Effort not shown may be considered as effort not done, possibly leading to the question closure. How do I ask a good question?. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Mar 27, 2022 at 11:53

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

No, they are not the same. A compound is called peroxide when they contains the peroxide bond ($\ce{-O-O -}$). However, in this context, nitrogen peroxide can be considered an equilibrium mixture of nitrogen dioxide and dinitrogen tetroxide in varying proportions. The first mention of this "compound" was in this 1944 paper, but not sure how accurate the information is in here considering an erratum has been published for this paper.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Yes I agree that a peroxide compund must have a peroxide bond (--O--O--) in it, but neither NO2 nor N2O4 has any. How it can still be called a Peroxide? Probably a dimer of N2O4 has --O--O-- bond in it. $\endgroup$ Mar 29, 2022 at 3:04
  • $\begingroup$ @JagbirSinghKanet As I said, nitrogen peroxide is not an official term. It can be considered the mixture of NO2 and N2O4 but it can add to more confusion as nitrogen peroxide in itself doesn't exist. Also, N2O4 doesn't have a dimer. $\endgroup$ Mar 29, 2022 at 3:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.