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While researching chemiluminescent reaction that normally require enzymes but are replaced with metallic catalysts, as mentioned in this research paper: Direct and Indirect Chemiluminescence: Reactions . I've bee trying to find similar papers on this, but with non-transition metals as catalysts; specifically group 1 and 2 metals. I appreciate the help


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Though I wouldn't term the use of $\ce{NaOH}$ or $\ce{NaHCO3}$ in the chemiluminescence of luminol a catalyst, per se, the reaction must proceed in an alkaline environment to produce light. However, "Transition metal complexes, such as the hexacyanoferrate ion are used to catalyze the decomposition of $\ce{H2O2}$."

Consider that transition metals have multiple oxidation states, so the metal ion can serve to transfer charges, and then return to the initial oxidation state, i.e., acting as a catalyst without being consumed. Group I and II generally have only a single oxidation state in solution, and would not do so.

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