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Most textbooks define "Gain of Oxygen" as oxidation. Why the gain of Fluorine is not included as part of the definitions since Fluorine is more electronegative than Oxygen?

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    $\begingroup$ Your statement is completely incorrect. Oxidation is all about change of oxidation state, not specific elements. $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Commented Feb 21, 2022 at 21:06
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    $\begingroup$ There is more than one meaning of "oxidation", just as a mole can be a small furry creature, and "organic" food is not defined fro m organic chemistry (and "organic meat" referred to viscera). $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 21, 2022 at 21:12
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    $\begingroup$ Most chemistry textbooks don't define oxidation like that. $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 21, 2022 at 22:03
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    $\begingroup$ Please wait for next week's lecture, or check the next two pages of your textbook. It is surely going to introduce a more refined definition of oxidation. If not, get a new textbook, or a new teacher. $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Commented Feb 21, 2022 at 22:05
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    $\begingroup$ See also IUPAC Goldbook and Wikipedia $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Feb 21, 2022 at 22:06

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