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Copper is a metallic element, so it is likely to be?

A. Poor conductor of electricity B. A substance with a low melting point C. Malleable D. Poor conductor of heat E. An element that forms negative ions

For me, C should be the only right. But are metallic elements really likely to be malleable?

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    $\begingroup$ While (C) is the correct answer (see all the ones below), I'll just point out that Cu is the classic example for work hardening in metallurgy. As you try to hammer/roll/bend it, it becomes less malleable. But that is likely never brought up in an introductory chemistry course... $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Sep 12 '14 at 18:36
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Yes, It is C.

Metals are:

-Generally good conductors of electricity -Substances with high melting points since they are mostly in liquid/solid states. Only liquid metal I can recall offhand is probably mercury, at room temperature and pressure of course. -They form positive ions because they usually lose electrons to gain octet configuration.


well, Wikipedia says "Metals are described as malleable (can be beaten into sheets) and ductile (can be pulled out into wires). This is because of the ability of the atoms to roll over each other into new positions without breaking the metallic bond."

Other examples of malleable metals are Gold, Silver and Iron.

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Metals generally have properties like good conductor of electricity,good Thermal conductivity,shiny,sonorous,lustrous,malleable(bitten into thin sheets under stress),ductile(drawn into wires),brittle,have high density,high melting and boiling point,generally solid in nature,forms positive ions etc... "exceptions are there".

well your question is regarding choosing the right option.so,you are right in your thought.correct answer is option c.

The answer regarding the second part of your,i think is no as exceptions are always there in periodic table.

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yes your answer is right.

well for your second question

Malleability, a similar property, is a material's ability to deform under compressive stress; this is often characterized by the material's ability to form a thin sheet by hammering or rolling

so basically you have to deal with some physics of elasticity here. Yes generally metals are ductile though there are exceptions like sodium, potasium etc.

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