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I am struggling to understand how exactly far infrared ceramic balls help purify the water. It is stated that active ceramic taormine balls help purify the water by forming a 2 micrometer wavelength electro-magnetic field (far infrared-red ray) along the water passageway.

Water molecules have a natural oscillation frequency of 2 micrometers. As the water passes through the filter, the FIR field will help in breaking up the water molecules (which are usually clumped together) into smaller pieces. This will help in maintaining a healthy body metabolism rate.

Far-infrared rays suppress the growth of excessive free radicals and shorten the cluster chain of water. The purified and activated water has smaller water clusters, which are more efficient at protecting cells from various stimulants.

Claims like these are made by companies. Is this feasible?

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    $\begingroup$ Claims about products associated with selling such products should not be generally believed until confirmed by independent sources not related to the selling profit. The last 2 paragraphs seems to me like tossing around scientific-like terms to overhelm ordinary people to believe there is big science behind. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 8:50
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    $\begingroup$ I think this is a well-elaborated question that can be useful for the future reference. Probably it's self-evident for specialists, but for average consumer it might be not. Instead of criticizing the post, I would thoroughly express why and how these promotion materials are wrong so that the fraud becomes evident for everyone. The question got many triggered, so use the rage against the companies' shady practices, not a person's post who dared to question their legitimacy. This scam needs to be exposed, not hidden. $\endgroup$
    – andselisk
    Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 14:20
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    $\begingroup$ @andselisk Good point, but I wouldn't know where to start. These claims are so totally random ... :D $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 19:12
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    $\begingroup$ @Albert 1. Water has no oscillation frequency, 2µm or other. 2. ceramic balls at room temperature do not emit any more FIR radiation than any other substance. 3. water clusters (which exist!) break up and re-form randomly at a tremendous rate anyway. (so much for homeopathy). 4. FIR energies cannot make or inhibit radicals. Sorry. Who tries to sell this? osmiowater.co.uk Vitamin C shower filter, great. :D $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 19:24
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    $\begingroup$ This one gave me a good laugh, too: osmiowater.co.uk/water-filters/… $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 19:27

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Thank you for the question.

Water molecules have a natural oscillation frequency of 2 micrometres. Not true. There is some absorption in infrared (≈ 1 µ- 10 µ), but this is neither dominant, nor is it "far infrared", nor is it specific to 2 µm. "Water absorbs over a wide range of electromagnetic radiation with rotational transitions and intermolecular vibrations responsible for absorption in the microwave (≈ 1 mm - 10 cm wavelength) and far-infrared (≈ 10 µm - 1 mm), intramolecular vibrational transitions in the infrared (≈ 1 µ- 10 µ) and electronic transitions occurring in the ultraviolet region (< 200 nm". https://water.lsbu.ac.uk/water/water_vibrational_spectrum.html

As the water passes through the filter, the FIR field . . . Random minerals emit no more far infrared (nor any other frequency) than other materials at the same temperature.

. . . breaking up the water molecules (which are usually clumped together) into smaller pieces Wot? Water molecules clumped together are called ice. Liquid water is more or less homogenous.

water has smaller water clusters, which are more efficient at protecting cells from various stimulants. This is simply made-up nonsense.

TL;DR Total bullshit, but I've seen it often enough to despair of the average person's educational level - including those who "claim to know".

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