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Water molecules cause hydrophobic interactions because
A- they can disrupt surfaces with no hydrogen bonds.
B- they prefer to be close to hydrophobic surfaces
C- they are restricted in their rotation when they are next to hydrophobic surfaces
D- All of the above

I'm confused regarding the answer of this question. Sometimes I feel it's "all the above" and sometimes that there is no clear good answer! If there was an answer saying that waters are more tightly bound to each other next to hydrophobic surfaces would it be better? Or is the answer "all the above" the correct one?

As I know, the hydrophobic effect will make water molecules surround the hydrophobic substances as much as they can to minimize the surface of it! So, the rest of the answers are the properties of the water but not related to the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Where did you find this ridiculous question? No wonder you're confused, it's based on the premise that water has hydrophobic interactions. Water has NO interactions with hydrophobic material, and that's it! (NO of course means "much less than with itself"). A, B,C are all wrong. ?!? $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Commented Dec 17, 2021 at 10:00

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The question is worded a bit strangely, but the answer is C. I presume the question is not asking about the "hydrophobic interactions" of water itself, but rather why water causes what we call the "hydrophobic effect".

A - they can disrupt surfaces with no hydrogen bonds - I'm not entirely sure what is meant here. It sounds like it means disrupting hydrophobic surfaces. Water does not break these up, it causes them to aggregate.

B - they prefer to be close to hydrophobic surfaces - this is the opposite of how water behaves. Water prefers to interact with polar molecules

C - they are restricted in their rotation when they are next to hydrophobic surfaces - This references the fact that the hydrophobic effect is entropy driven. Water around a non-polar surface forms ordered cages (restricted rotation), and thus this is entropically unfavorable.

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