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For potassium ferrocyanide/yellow prussiate/potassium hexacyanoferrate(II), I identified only commercial sources of the trihydrate, $\ce{K4[Fe(CN)6] * 3H2O}$.

What are the conditions (temperature, because I guess heating in an oven might suffice) to completely remove the crystal water in this chemical?

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    $\begingroup$ Anhydrous trihydrate is a glaring example of an oxymoron, much like "Little Big Horn" or "honest politician". $\endgroup$ Oct 26 at 20:28
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site. Note, chemical information may be advantageously formatted using on ChemSE with mhchem. Take moment to familiarize with this. You are encouraged to use it in the body of questions, answers, and comments. Because it is something special not all web browsers understand well, do not use it in the title of questions or answers. $\endgroup$
    – Buttonwood
    Oct 26 at 21:11
  • $\begingroup$ One suitable approach is to look up the information provided by the chemical suppliers about the trihydrate (example Millipore/Sigma) and to note the CAS registry number. Use this number in chemistry relevant databases (e.g., Reaxys by Elsevier, Scifinder by the American Chemical Society) to look up primary references describing this (if you really need this, check with your TA) in a research library. As the librarian of your uni for assistance how to use these sources. $\endgroup$
    – Buttonwood
    Oct 26 at 21:16
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Just heat it.

enter image description here

Alternatively refer to this paper.

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