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I am trying to collect the environmental properties (GWP and ODP) of several chemicals. However, I am experiencing some problems with retrieving these properties for some fluids.

For example, I cannot find the GWP nor ODP of:

  • cyclobutene
  • Methanol (Or is the GWP and ODP negligible as Methanol is liquid in ambient conditions?)

I would think this information is widely documented, however I am struggling to find these properties for some chemicals. Is there a database available of these properties? Also, is it safe to assume a negligible ODP and GWP of fluids which are liquid in ambient conditions?

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    $\begingroup$ It is adviced to always explain abbreviations not used widely and generally, in text or link. // GWP = Global warming potential // ODP = Ozone depletion potential $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Sep 21, 2021 at 13:59
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    $\begingroup$ Methanol is not much relevant, as it is not released in big amounts and it is hydrophilic, effectively purged out of atmosphere by water circulation. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Sep 21, 2021 at 14:08
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    $\begingroup$ Many molecules have no ODP and many reactive molecules will have such short lifetimes in the atmosphere that their GWP will be, effectively, zero. Both are probably true for your two examples. $\endgroup$
    – matt_black
    Sep 21, 2021 at 16:46

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cyclobutene GWP is likely <2, methanol is likely <15.

Reasons: closest examples, methane 25, propane 3, most hydrocarbons 0 to 5. Hydroxyl and C=C link reduce GWP by a lot.

https://refrigeranthq.com/refrigerant-2/hydrocarbons/

Their both ODP is likely 0.

Reason: closest examples, propane 0.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone_depletion_potential

You cant assume liquids under normal conditions to have zero ODP or GWP.

Reason: water is a liquid, and yet we have clouds and it is the main global warming gas.

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