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I know that ozone is a polar molecule. And our master has used the existence of nonbonding electron pairs on the central atom to justify this subject. I want to know how much the nonbonding electron pairs affects the polarity of the molecule? And if it does, why do nonbonding electrons have no effect on the side atoms?

My English is not very good and I apologize if the wrong terms are used in the phrases.

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    $\begingroup$ Have you checked ozone page on wikipedia ? // In contrary to some other Q/A or forum sites, answers on CH SE site are figuratively paid by the user's own effort. When you ask, it is expected you have thoroughly searched and thought about the topic, providing explicit summary of partial answers/ideas/thoughts you have got until then. Effort not shown may be considered as effort not done and such a question may get closed. How do I ask a good question. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Sep 13, 2021 at 9:57

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In fact the nonbonding electron pairs on the end atoms do affect ozone's polarity, and because the end atoms have more nonbonding electrons they are actually the ones at the negative end of the dipole. The central atom with only a single nonbonding pair (and a positive formal charge) is at the positive end. See also this answer.

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