1
$\begingroup$

In the 1960s and before, even black and white letters had some lead from the actual metallic letters used by typesetters -- some rubbed off. Same thing with books printed before 1970 or so and libraries were concerned about kids' books and started to take the older ones off the shelves.

But what had a really large amount of lead was the funny pages, the pigment itself had lead and other metals. I assume this is no longer the case and if so, what is now used for color in newspapers and magazines?

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Presently, the white color of the paper is due to $\ce{CaCO3}$ for ordinary paper, and by $\ce{TiO2}$ for precious documents. $\endgroup$
    – Maurice
    Sep 9 at 19:59
3
$\begingroup$

Into the 70's the better white paints were tri-metal; lead, zinc and tin (oxides). Titanium oxide ( rutile ) replaced the lead and the zinc and tin adjusted . The Ti has excellent hiding power so the whiteness actually improved. In addition in urban locations, the lead yellowed with age because of sulfur pollution. So a win/win for lead removal. Calcium carbonate is primarily a filler to reduce cost. Answer for house paint not printing inks.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.