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For this question, assume all things not mentioned are perfectly controlled, all at 14.7lbs of atmospheric pressure, and water is 100% pure of anything not mentioned, with no dissolved air.

Given a quantity of water that is 1 liter at 20°, what would the volume be when heated to 30°?

Secondly, the same question, except the water being heated is fully saturated with salt.

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    $\begingroup$ It would be useful if scientists would translate this data into something more meaningful to lay people. For example, for 1 litre of sea water at the average salinity, the average global temperature and average air-pressure in millibars, what would be the volume be at increments of 0.5°. e.g. at what temperature would it be 1.1 litres? $\endgroup$ – Julius Marstrand Nov 19 '17 at 7:29
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The volumetric expansion of a liquid is given by the following equation $$\Delta V=V_0\beta\Delta T$$ where $\beta$ is the coefficient of thermal expansion and $\Delta T$ is the change in temperature.

Here's a link to a nice table containing coefficients of expansion for water, both pure and salinated. Wikipedia shows the maximum solubility of salt in water to be around 36% (w/w).

From the first link we find that

for pure water at $25\ \mathrm{^\circ C}$: $\beta = 257\times10^{-6}/\mathrm K$

for water with 35% $\ce{NaCl}$ dissolved at $25\ \mathrm{^\circ C}$: $\beta= 297\times10^{-6}/\mathrm K$

Now you should be able to calculate the values you are interested in.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks so much. This is very interesting. For whatever reason, this morning I came up with a theory that perhaps more of the see rise we are experiencing is due to expansion than is due to new water in the oceans. Immediately after asking this question, I Googled and found that this theory is nothing new, and that expansion might actually account for 70% of sea rise. $\endgroup$ – orokusaki Aug 25 '14 at 15:24
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For a starting point I would suggest http://web.mit.edu/seawater although this will not help much on the 'saturated' end of things since the salinity values in the tables do not reach the 20C saturation values. I leave finding the saturation value to the requester, since google brings it up quite easily.

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