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So my teacher told me that PCl6- exists, But how? What I don't understand is that Phosphorus has 5 valence electrons hence a covalency of 5 but this doesn't allow for 6 fluorine atoms to bond with Phosphorus. Can someone show me the hybridisation or the technical reason and my teacher left off by saying that P can have hypervalent due to d orbitals but if electrons arent present to bond then how does this happen?

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    $\begingroup$ Try to search this site for similar questions, as similar topics have been asked multiple times. If googling, insert the term "site:chemistry.stackexchange.com". $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Aug 12, 2021 at 10:10
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    $\begingroup$ Related for SF6 and false idea of involving of d orbitals in $\mathrm{sp^3d^2}$ hybridization. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Aug 12, 2021 at 10:17
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    $\begingroup$ @orthocresol is the author of the linked answer and has much better insight, ragarding what from the link is applicable and what is to be added or modified. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Aug 12, 2021 at 10:30
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    $\begingroup$ @Poutnik OP's name suggests he is from India, where these hypervalent hybridizations are widely and unambiguously taught throughout grades 11 and 12. I have recently finished my 12th, and before I joined this site I also believed this false myth. Most unfortunate - those who don't take up chemistry in higher studies never even get to know that this entire concept is flawed. $\endgroup$
    – TRC
    Aug 12, 2021 at 13:48
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    $\begingroup$ @TRC I remember being taught that as well in 80s. // If there is some test/exam/homework question that insists on the wrong sp3d2 hybridization answer then both electrons on the 6th orbital would come from F- anion, forming 6 fully occupied sp3d2 orbitals. // BTW LiPF6 solution in dialkylcarbonate mix is the electrolyte in Li-Ion cells. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Aug 12, 2021 at 14:01

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