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I accidentally overheated an aluminum espresso maker, to around 250-300° C in my estimation, but it might be even higher - I didn't measure, though. After research, I found that the material used is an aluminum alloy named Aluminum 1110. Now I wonder if, in general, overheated aluminum cookware is still safe to use. To find out, I would first need to know:

What can happen to an aluminum alloy when overheating? Will an aluminum alloy release (significantly) more aluminum (or other elements/molecules for that matter) after overheating? And out of sheer curiosity, why would that happen?

From the help page, I couldn't quite tell if this is the right place to ask, so excuse me if it isn't.

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    $\begingroup$ It reads like you put the Bialetti cooker on the stove and forgot to refill the water. By personal experience (student dormitory, and hot aluminum on the stove just looks like cold one) my concern would be more about their little replaceable safety valve in their foot; of course a question of overall age/wear of the valve, temperature and time of being hot and empty on the stove. Suggest: cooking.stackexchange.com. $\endgroup$
    – Buttonwood
    Aug 6 at 20:51
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    $\begingroup$ The question is in a grey zone. Sure, there might be some chemistry going on, but this might also be a matter of engineering and food safety. I don't think you can expect an exhaustive answer here. $\endgroup$ Aug 6 at 22:33
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If it did not melt or distort, then not much happens. 1100 series is more or less pure aluminum, different designations will permit different levels of tramp elements like silicon, iron, copper, etc. It will anneal / soften, if any cold work / strain hardening was present. Without looking it up, very high temperatures like 800 °F (427 °C) could possible cause grain boundary oxidation which could seriously weaken it. The only health risk would be be touching it while hot.

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