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If I have a list of compounds and I compare their SN1 reactivity, for SN2 reactivity, is it correct to use the same list but order inverted? Are there any exceptions?

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Short answer: no, it is not correct.

You can have compounds that are thermodynamically/kinetically impeded for a variety of reasons and present both slow SN1 and SN2 reactivities.

The exceptions would be carefully handcrafted “everything else being equal” lists.

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    $\begingroup$ Also it really depends on external factors. There is no absolute order to use. $\endgroup$ Jul 21 at 15:23
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No.

Example 1 - neopentyl halide: slow SN2 as it has considerable steric hindrance; slow SN1 as it is a primary carbon, so it does not form stable carbocation intermediate.

Example 2 - benzyl halide: fast SN2 being a primary carbon; fast SN1 due to a resonance-stabilized benzyl carbocation intermediate.

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